Guest Columns Archive

  • In her blog at fitstudio.com, Andrea Metcalf spells out why drinking water is important. In her words …. One of the most important things you can do to achieve and maintain good health is amazingly simple: Drink lots of water! Water revitalizes your body and flushes out toxins. In addition, people often think they’re hungry when in fact they’re only thirsty. Accordingly, drinking water can help you lose weight as well. The amount of water you need will vary, depending partly on your activity level. If you’re not active, you should drink a minimum of eight cups of water per day. If you’re working out regularly, you’ll probably need more to replace fluids lost during exercise. The following conditions may indicate that you’re not getting enough water: fatigue loss of appetite flushed skin heat intolerance light-headedness dark urine with a strong odor These days, you face a choice of spring water, mineral water, tap water, sparkling water, and various other options. Which one’s for you? The most convenient choice is water from your faucet. Tap water contains a variety of useful minerals. In many areas, however, it also contains contaminants such as pesticides, chlorine byproducts, and harmful microorganisms. If you’re concerned about contamination, bottled water is an option (or) you might choose to drink tap water that has been run through a filter. No matter what kind of water you choose, the bottom line is to drink lots of it! Andrea Metcalf has been teaching fitness and nutrition and training clients since 1983. She is the author of the book Naked Fitness and has produced a number of fitness DVDs. You can follow her on Twitter at @Andreametcalf. Share on Facebook

    WATER: A SIMPLE SECRET TO GOOD HEALTH

    In her blog at fitstudio.com, Andrea Metcalf spells out why drinking water is important. In her words …. One of the most important things you can do to achieve and maintain good health is amazingly simple: Drink lots of water! Water revitalizes your body and flushes out toxins. In addition, people often think they’re hungry when in fact they’re only thirsty. Accordingly, drinking water can help you lose weight as well. The amount of water you need will vary, depending partly on your activity level. If you’re not active, you should drink a minimum of eight cups of water per day. If you’re working out regularly, you’ll probably need more to replace fluids lost during exercise. The following conditions may indicate that you’re not getting enough water: fatigue loss of appetite flushed skin heat intolerance light-headedness dark urine with a strong odor These days, you face a choice of spring water, mineral water, tap water, sparkling water, and various other options. Which one’s for you? The most convenient choice is water from your faucet. Tap water contains a variety of useful minerals. In many areas, however, it also contains contaminants such as pesticides, chlorine byproducts, and harmful microorganisms. If you’re concerned about contamination, bottled water is an option (or) you might choose to drink tap water that has been run through a filter. No matter what kind of water you choose, the bottom line is to drink lots of it! Andrea Metcalf has been teaching fitness and nutrition and training clients since 1983. She is the author of the book Naked Fitness and has produced a number of fitness DVDs. You can follow her on Twitter at @Andreametcalf. Share on Facebook

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  • – January 2011 President Barack Obama emphasized rebuilding America in his second (2011) State of the Union address and called for renewed investments in the aging infrastructure systems that sustain economic growth and competitiveness and serve as engines for American jobs. The National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) applauds the President for his leadership on the issue of renewing America’s commitment to infrastructure investments but is disappointed that the President did not include mention of the need to recommit to investing in our water and wastewater infrastructure. America’s communities face a $500 billion need in clean water and drinking water infrastructure investments and federal  leadership and support for greater investment in this infrastructure is essential if we expect our economy  to thrive. It is well documented that our water infrastructure is reaching a tipping point. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) latest infrastructure report card gave the nation’s water infrastructure a D-, the lowest of any infrastructure category. As a result, each day the nation suffers significant losses and damages from broken water and sewer mains, sewage overflows, and scarcity of drinking water supplies among other challenges. Source: National Association of Clean Water Agencies – January 26, 2011 http://www.waterchat.com/News/Federal/11/Q1/fed_110128-03.htm Share on Facebook

    Guest Column: State of the Water Union

    – January 2011 President Barack Obama emphasized rebuilding America in his second (2011) State of the Union address and called for renewed investments in the aging infrastructure systems that sustain economic growth and competitiveness and serve as engines for American jobs. The National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) applauds the President for his leadership on the issue of renewing America’s commitment to infrastructure investments but is disappointed that the President did not include mention of the need to recommit to investing in our water and wastewater infrastructure. America’s communities face a $500 billion need in clean water and drinking water infrastructure investments and federal  leadership and support for greater investment in this infrastructure is essential if we expect our economy  to thrive. It is well documented that our water infrastructure is reaching a tipping point. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) latest infrastructure report card gave the nation’s water infrastructure a D-, the lowest of any infrastructure category. As a result, each day the nation suffers significant losses and damages from broken water and sewer mains, sewage overflows, and scarcity of drinking water supplies among other challenges. Source: National Association of Clean Water Agencies – January 26, 2011 http://www.waterchat.com/News/Federal/11/Q1/fed_110128-03.htm Share on Facebook

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