Food Marketing & Nutrition Archive

  • The new news for 2015 is that American has fallen out of love with soda. But in an effort to keep sales up,the beverage industry in 2013 pulled out the stops to delay enforcement of NYC’s plan to limit the sale of super-sized, sugar-sweetened beverages set to take effect mid-March. It worked; however, industry’s million dollar lobbying efforts have not stemmed the tide of consumers backing off buying soft drinks.  Share on Facebook

    NYC Soda Ban Review

    The new news for 2015 is that American has fallen out of love with soda. But in an effort to keep sales up,the beverage industry in 2013 pulled out the stops to delay enforcement of NYC’s plan to limit the sale of super-sized, sugar-sweetened beverages set to take effect mid-March. It worked; however, industry’s million dollar lobbying efforts have not stemmed the tide of consumers backing off buying soft drinks.  Share on Facebook

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  • Great Fun. Presenting  “Who Owns Hydration” at the Inaugural Healthy Beverage Expo (June 2013). “Healthy” is hot. Healthy beverages are way “cool”. Share on Facebook

    Healthy Beverage Expo in Las Vegas

    Great Fun. Presenting  “Who Owns Hydration” at the Inaugural Healthy Beverage Expo (June 2013). “Healthy” is hot. Healthy beverages are way “cool”. Share on Facebook

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  • Nutritionists, marketing experts and others who study sugary drink trends note cutting back is not so easy. Pierre Chandon, who studies how people make consumption decisions and how marketing can affect us without our even noticing it thinks that while consumers know that the purpose of advertising is to get us to buy things, they have no idea that the size and shape of a package can also influence us. Using different cup sizes from a fast food restaurant, Chandon, who is a marketing professor at Paris-based INSEAD, developed a soda quiz. The test is designed to point out that people often purchase larger cup sizes thinking that they are getting more for their money, which they are. But the real point is that the larger sizes are what’s making people fat. [The quiz accompanied an article, “How Can a Big Gulp Look So Small?,” published in the June 24 issue of The New York Times.] Chandon, who spent his summer as a visiting scholar at the Harvard Business School, told listeners on the H2O For Health radio show that understanding drink labels and calculating serving size and calories is increasingly tricky because a single bottle of soda is typically more than a single serving. As he likes to point out, Coca-Cola was only sold in 6.5 ounce bottles when it was first launched. Today, some people regularly purchase 64-ounce sizes of fountain drinks. Prof. Chandon summed consumers’ struggle this way. “Imagine there is a river and the banks of the river are slippery and so yes, it’s your personal choice to be careful and pay attention and not fall into the water. At the same time, clearly, the industry is trying to attract you to the river because that’s what they do.” In fact, the beverage industry argues that people have the right to choose their beverage. Prof. Chandon’s research attempts to find out how industry, the public health community and government can find a way around indfustry selling more and more calories that lead to higher obesity rate and health problems. Meanwhile, a coalition of health and consumer advocates and city public health departments have requested that U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin launch a study on the health effects of soda and other sugary drinks. Health advocates say they want government intervention to help people make better decisions and stem the costly obesity crisis. While most people have healthy long-term goals, Prof. Chandon told listeners that, “In the short-term, we all go for taste. That’s an immediate reward that we may regret later.” One way around this, he believes, is to create marketing that focuses on simple solution: satiation. That’s where water comes in. Water delivers maximum hydration with zero calories and can sometimes keep people from over-eating or consuming a less healthy beverage Share on Facebook

    Demystifying Cup Sizes

    Nutritionists, marketing experts and others who study sugary drink trends note cutting back is not so easy. Pierre Chandon, who studies how people make consumption decisions and how marketing can affect us without our even noticing it thinks that while consumers know that the purpose of advertising is to get us to buy things, they have no idea that the size and shape of a package can also influence us. Using different cup sizes from a fast food restaurant, Chandon, who is a marketing professor at Paris-based INSEAD, developed a soda quiz. The test is designed to point out that people often purchase larger cup sizes thinking that they are getting more for their money, which they are. But the real point is that the larger sizes are what’s making people fat. [The quiz accompanied an article, “How Can a Big Gulp Look So Small?,” published in the June 24 issue of The New York Times.] Chandon, who spent his summer as a visiting scholar at the Harvard Business School, told listeners on the H2O For Health radio show that understanding drink labels and calculating serving size and calories is increasingly tricky because a single bottle of soda is typically more than a single serving. As he likes to point out, Coca-Cola was only sold in 6.5 ounce bottles when it was first launched. Today, some people regularly purchase 64-ounce sizes of fountain drinks. Prof. Chandon summed consumers’ struggle this way. “Imagine there is a river and the banks of the river are slippery and so yes, it’s your personal choice to be careful and pay attention and not fall into the water. At the same time, clearly, the industry is trying to attract you to the river because that’s what they do.” In fact, the beverage industry argues that people have the right to choose their beverage. Prof. Chandon’s research attempts to find out how industry, the public health community and government can find a way around indfustry selling more and more calories that lead to higher obesity rate and health problems. Meanwhile, a coalition of health and consumer advocates and city public health departments have requested that U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin launch a study on the health effects of soda and other sugary drinks. Health advocates say they want government intervention to help people make better decisions and stem the costly obesity crisis. While most people have healthy long-term goals, Prof. Chandon told listeners that, “In the short-term, we all go for taste. That’s an immediate reward that we may regret later.” One way around this, he believes, is to create marketing that focuses on simple solution: satiation. That’s where water comes in. Water delivers maximum hydration with zero calories and can sometimes keep people from over-eating or consuming a less healthy beverage Share on Facebook

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  • Corporations line up to fight wasting water If we are to understand the global water crisis, we must first ask, “Who uses more water: people, agriculture or food processors?” Secondly, we must know if the problem of lack of safe drinking water for close to a billion people on the planet stems from a lack of awareness of the importance of this issue or a failure to act appropriately. In a 2011 survey of adults living in the U.S., Dallas-based Shelton Group gave respondents a handful of environmental choices and asked them to choose just one, or they could opt for a million dollars. Thirty-five percent selected making clean water for the world a priority and only 28 percent chose to take the money. The other third of respondents picked other options: stop global warming, save the rainforests, and save the world’s endangered species. So in the case of the world’s drinking water needs, it’s pretty clear that awareness is quite high, which may be why some non-governmental organizations (NGO, for short) target their donor appeals to this cause. The result is that campaigns for humanity often employ traditional and social media advertising strategies that depict deplorable situations. But how organizations call attention to a problem of crisis proportion may just be the problem. USEPA took note of this is partnering with advertising executives in a new campaign that uses humor instead of the guilt approach in an effort to get people to conserve tap water. The “Wasting Water Is Weird” campaign employs “Rip the Drip” as its primary spokesperson. Rip – as in the guy’s a “drip,” a derogatory phrase from the 1950s applied to annoying youth — is definitely not someone you want to discover in your driveway, bathroom or kitchen. But that’s exactly where “Rip the Drip,” whose attire consists of a so-called “wife-beaters” undershirt and day old(s) facial hair growth, appears in the videos and ads in several 30-second executions initially rolled out on YouTube, and according to trade industry news reports, also to 60-plus TV markets. The premise of the omnipresent nerd in the life of the onscreen average Jane and Joe’s is to be the angry voice inside each of us that says do the opposite of what we’re being asked to do (a very sophisticated read on today’s authority-resistant culture). So, “Rip the Drip” reminds consumers who unthinkingly waste water doing everyday chores, such as letting the faucet run while brushing teeth, to think about their actions. He does this by acknowledging how much he likes wasting water. Offscreen, according to the agency’s storyline, Rip works at a water park, takes long showers, opens fire hydrants for fun, and loves listening to running faucets. Marketing professionals will tell you that it takes more than awareness of an issue to affect changes in behavior: witness anti-smoking, anti-drug and teen pregnancy campaigns. And Shelton’s own research found that over 60 percent of people already turn off the water when brushing their teeth. So, is the […]

    Humor vs. Dire Straights – Challenging the conventional NGO Approach

    Corporations line up to fight wasting water If we are to understand the global water crisis, we must first ask, “Who uses more water: people, agriculture or food processors?” Secondly, we must know if the problem of lack of safe drinking water for close to a billion people on the planet stems from a lack of awareness of the importance of this issue or a failure to act appropriately. In a 2011 survey of adults living in the U.S., Dallas-based Shelton Group gave respondents a handful of environmental choices and asked them to choose just one, or they could opt for a million dollars. Thirty-five percent selected making clean water for the world a priority and only 28 percent chose to take the money. The other third of respondents picked other options: stop global warming, save the rainforests, and save the world’s endangered species. So in the case of the world’s drinking water needs, it’s pretty clear that awareness is quite high, which may be why some non-governmental organizations (NGO, for short) target their donor appeals to this cause. The result is that campaigns for humanity often employ traditional and social media advertising strategies that depict deplorable situations. But how organizations call attention to a problem of crisis proportion may just be the problem. USEPA took note of this is partnering with advertising executives in a new campaign that uses humor instead of the guilt approach in an effort to get people to conserve tap water. The “Wasting Water Is Weird” campaign employs “Rip the Drip” as its primary spokesperson. Rip – as in the guy’s a “drip,” a derogatory phrase from the 1950s applied to annoying youth — is definitely not someone you want to discover in your driveway, bathroom or kitchen. But that’s exactly where “Rip the Drip,” whose attire consists of a so-called “wife-beaters” undershirt and day old(s) facial hair growth, appears in the videos and ads in several 30-second executions initially rolled out on YouTube, and according to trade industry news reports, also to 60-plus TV markets. The premise of the omnipresent nerd in the life of the onscreen average Jane and Joe’s is to be the angry voice inside each of us that says do the opposite of what we’re being asked to do (a very sophisticated read on today’s authority-resistant culture). So, “Rip the Drip” reminds consumers who unthinkingly waste water doing everyday chores, such as letting the faucet run while brushing teeth, to think about their actions. He does this by acknowledging how much he likes wasting water. Offscreen, according to the agency’s storyline, Rip works at a water park, takes long showers, opens fire hydrants for fun, and loves listening to running faucets. Marketing professionals will tell you that it takes more than awareness of an issue to affect changes in behavior: witness anti-smoking, anti-drug and teen pregnancy campaigns. And Shelton’s own research found that over 60 percent of people already turn off the water when brushing their teeth. So, is the […]

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