Archive for July, 2015

  • Hydration & Fitness: No One-Size-Fits All. After cancer,  Alzheimer’s — with its progressive damage to nerve cells, memory loss, impaired thinking, difficulties with verbal communication, and even personality changes — is the second most feared disease, according to an international survey. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in America. Over five million in the US. have the disease and it is estimated that it will affect millions more in the years to come. As most of us know, someone with Alzheimer’s disease can live for years, even decades when, the disease becomes a huge emotional, physical, and economic burden on families. Reading through emails this morning, there was my daily blast from the Harvard Medical School that suggested ways of lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, including the need to keep important health numbers (cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, etc) within a safe range along with taking an accurate waistline measurement. But for most of us, other recommendations followed the general advice of maintaining a healthy weight through diet and regular exercise. As I extend my research beyond water for health to the need for fitness, what’s becoming clearer is that there really is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to mindful eating and exercise. What works for me may or may not work for you. Pilates masters, for example, say that the Pilates exercises you do at your Barre studio may have some relationship to Pilates, but they are not the same as the Pilates exercises that Joseph H. Pilates conceived and are practiced at classical Pilates studios. Similarly, my field of focus for years has been drinking water. And what I know is that not all water is the same. Hydration through sugary drinks, which soft drinks touted as a benefit (“Who know Coke Hydrates?” was a Coke slogan) is not the same as drinking water from the tap. And tap water may not be the same as drinking bottled water, which while it has its environmental drawbacks, can be better than tap water when taken from a pure source and hasn’t traveled through miles of pipes only to be dumped at your door step and left for homeowners to finish the job of filtering out any unwanted taste, odors or unregulated compounds. For more on ways to help prevent Alzheimer’s as well as information on diagnosing and treating it, search for A Guide to Coping with Alzheimer’s Disease from Harvard Medical School. Share on Facebook

    Hydration & Fitness: There is No One-Size-Fits-All

    Hydration & Fitness: No One-Size-Fits All. After cancer,  Alzheimer’s — with its progressive damage to nerve cells, memory loss, impaired thinking, difficulties with verbal communication, and even personality changes — is the second most feared disease, according to an international survey. Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in America. Over five million in the US. have the disease and it is estimated that it will affect millions more in the years to come. As most of us know, someone with Alzheimer’s disease can live for years, even decades when, the disease becomes a huge emotional, physical, and economic burden on families. Reading through emails this morning, there was my daily blast from the Harvard Medical School that suggested ways of lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, including the need to keep important health numbers (cholesterol, triglycerides, blood sugar, etc) within a safe range along with taking an accurate waistline measurement. But for most of us, other recommendations followed the general advice of maintaining a healthy weight through diet and regular exercise. As I extend my research beyond water for health to the need for fitness, what’s becoming clearer is that there really is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to mindful eating and exercise. What works for me may or may not work for you. Pilates masters, for example, say that the Pilates exercises you do at your Barre studio may have some relationship to Pilates, but they are not the same as the Pilates exercises that Joseph H. Pilates conceived and are practiced at classical Pilates studios. Similarly, my field of focus for years has been drinking water. And what I know is that not all water is the same. Hydration through sugary drinks, which soft drinks touted as a benefit (“Who know Coke Hydrates?” was a Coke slogan) is not the same as drinking water from the tap. And tap water may not be the same as drinking bottled water, which while it has its environmental drawbacks, can be better than tap water when taken from a pure source and hasn’t traveled through miles of pipes only to be dumped at your door step and left for homeowners to finish the job of filtering out any unwanted taste, odors or unregulated compounds. For more on ways to help prevent Alzheimer’s as well as information on diagnosing and treating it, search for A Guide to Coping with Alzheimer’s Disease from Harvard Medical School. Share on Facebook

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  • The new news for 2015 is that American has fallen out of love with soda. But in an effort to keep sales up,the beverage industry in 2013 pulled out the stops to delay enforcement of NYC’s plan to limit the sale of super-sized, sugar-sweetened beverages set to take effect mid-March. It worked; however, industry’s million dollar lobbying efforts have not stemmed the tide of consumers backing off buying soft drinks.  Share on Facebook

    NYC Soda Ban Review

    The new news for 2015 is that American has fallen out of love with soda. But in an effort to keep sales up,the beverage industry in 2013 pulled out the stops to delay enforcement of NYC’s plan to limit the sale of super-sized, sugar-sweetened beverages set to take effect mid-March. It worked; however, industry’s million dollar lobbying efforts have not stemmed the tide of consumers backing off buying soft drinks.  Share on Facebook

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  • Imagine this. With minimal warning you are told on one of the hottest weeks of Summer with a heat index over 100 that your tap water will be shut off for the foreseeable future. India, Pakistan, Africa? None of these. It happened to 100,000 residents of Prince Georges (PG)  County, Maryland–a community just outside Washington, DC–in July 2013. Life is full of work-arounds. You avoid a traffic snarl by taking a back road. People in Prince Georges County were told to fill bath tubs and buy bottled water. One resident recalls purchasing 42 gallons. Businesses too were on their own. Problems like this in part help explain the controversy surrounding tap water in America. But so do marketing efforts that confuse people. Inside the beltway, DC Water promotes tap only. Home water treatment company Brita, a division of Clorox, challenges people to ban the bottle. Some, like Culligan, have even used print advertising to suggest that people may not actually know what’s in their tap water. Most of us carry around two sets of ideas. In a new study, the Young & Rubicam advertising agency concluded that while we may profess one idea, we often conceal another motivation. People may say that they are either for or against tap water or bottled water, but in reality they may consume both, or even substitute a different beverage for water. Working around all the vested interests in drinking water in America, Michelle Obama and the Partnership for a Healthier America launched a simple and sweet initiative to encourage each of us to make an easy choice to improve our health and well-being. Uniting the World of Drinking Water Mrs. Obama’s big idea? Drink more water. “I’ve come to realize that if we were going to take just one step to make ourselves and our families healthier, probably the single best thing we could do is to simply drink more water every day,” the First Lady said during a kickoff event in Watertown, Wisconsin on September 12. Still, a spokesman for Mrs. Obama was asked to clarify if this includes bottled water. It does. “Whether it comes from a faucet, an underground spring, a rambling river or a plastic bottle, the message is: ‘Drink up.” Partisan rancor being what it now is, however, an initiative to get Americans to drink more water–backed by the American Beverage Association and the International Bottled Water Association–ignited controversy and prompted skepticism among some citizen interest groups promoting tap water over bottled water and others who challenge the 8×8 convention. While the health benefits of drinking water are well understood, there is confusion about whether we need to drink eight 8-ounces glasses each day. Further, environmental groups that want people to avoid drinking from plastic water bottles were also uncomfortable with the announcement, even though for close to a billion people on our planet there is no such thing as safe and pure water from a tap and these groups, it seems, typically fail to include other plastic […]

    Safe Water, Fresh Look at the Tap

    Imagine this. With minimal warning you are told on one of the hottest weeks of Summer with a heat index over 100 that your tap water will be shut off for the foreseeable future. India, Pakistan, Africa? None of these. It happened to 100,000 residents of Prince Georges (PG)  County, Maryland–a community just outside Washington, DC–in July 2013. Life is full of work-arounds. You avoid a traffic snarl by taking a back road. People in Prince Georges County were told to fill bath tubs and buy bottled water. One resident recalls purchasing 42 gallons. Businesses too were on their own. Problems like this in part help explain the controversy surrounding tap water in America. But so do marketing efforts that confuse people. Inside the beltway, DC Water promotes tap only. Home water treatment company Brita, a division of Clorox, challenges people to ban the bottle. Some, like Culligan, have even used print advertising to suggest that people may not actually know what’s in their tap water. Most of us carry around two sets of ideas. In a new study, the Young & Rubicam advertising agency concluded that while we may profess one idea, we often conceal another motivation. People may say that they are either for or against tap water or bottled water, but in reality they may consume both, or even substitute a different beverage for water. Working around all the vested interests in drinking water in America, Michelle Obama and the Partnership for a Healthier America launched a simple and sweet initiative to encourage each of us to make an easy choice to improve our health and well-being. Uniting the World of Drinking Water Mrs. Obama’s big idea? Drink more water. “I’ve come to realize that if we were going to take just one step to make ourselves and our families healthier, probably the single best thing we could do is to simply drink more water every day,” the First Lady said during a kickoff event in Watertown, Wisconsin on September 12. Still, a spokesman for Mrs. Obama was asked to clarify if this includes bottled water. It does. “Whether it comes from a faucet, an underground spring, a rambling river or a plastic bottle, the message is: ‘Drink up.” Partisan rancor being what it now is, however, an initiative to get Americans to drink more water–backed by the American Beverage Association and the International Bottled Water Association–ignited controversy and prompted skepticism among some citizen interest groups promoting tap water over bottled water and others who challenge the 8×8 convention. While the health benefits of drinking water are well understood, there is confusion about whether we need to drink eight 8-ounces glasses each day. Further, environmental groups that want people to avoid drinking from plastic water bottles were also uncomfortable with the announcement, even though for close to a billion people on our planet there is no such thing as safe and pure water from a tap and these groups, it seems, typically fail to include other plastic […]

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