Obesity Archive

  • The new news for 2015 is that American has fallen out of love with soda. But in an effort to keep sales up,the beverage industry in 2013 pulled out the stops to delay enforcement of NYC’s plan to limit the sale of super-sized, sugar-sweetened beverages set to take effect mid-March. It worked; however, industry’s million dollar lobbying efforts have not stemmed the tide of consumers backing off buying soft drinks.  Share on Facebook

    NYC Soda Ban Review

    The new news for 2015 is that American has fallen out of love with soda. But in an effort to keep sales up,the beverage industry in 2013 pulled out the stops to delay enforcement of NYC’s plan to limit the sale of super-sized, sugar-sweetened beverages set to take effect mid-March. It worked; however, industry’s million dollar lobbying efforts have not stemmed the tide of consumers backing off buying soft drinks.  Share on Facebook

    Continue Reading...

  • — Updated Feb 1, 2011 Researchers say that most people deny eating a lot of sugar. While over one-third of American adults are obese, researchers at Harvard University now predict that if current trends continue, the obesity rate in the U.S. won’t level off until it reaches over 40 percent. But despite warning signs – epidemic rates of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure and depression – people continue to indulge their sugar habit. The result is cause for alarm. Among obesity scientists, health providers and the medical community, there is major concern about sugar’s addictive quality. Barry Popkin, author of “The World is FAT” thinks that sugar-based diets, especially high consumption of soft drinks, are killing us. According to another source, Nature Cures Clinic of Portland, Oregon, our “daily bread” has turned into a non-stop feeding frenzy of sweets, artificial sweeteners and refined carbohydrates. What to do? Exercise, of course. Eat more fruits, vegetables and whole grains and reduce salt and saturated fats, absolutely. Health and policy professionals like Profs. Popkin and world-renown public health scholars, Harvard’s Prof. Walter Willet and Yale Prof. Kelly D. Brownell, also recommend drinking more water. And now, as of January 31, 2011, so does the federal government. For the first time ever in its revised dietary Guidelines, the USDA recommends replacing sugary drinks like soda with water and avoiding fatty foods. [Link: www.cnpp.usda.gov/DietaryGuidelines.htm] (c) 2011 Jonathan Hall Share on Facebook

    Sugar Habit

    — Updated Feb 1, 2011 Researchers say that most people deny eating a lot of sugar. While over one-third of American adults are obese, researchers at Harvard University now predict that if current trends continue, the obesity rate in the U.S. won’t level off until it reaches over 40 percent. But despite warning signs – epidemic rates of diabetes, heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure and depression – people continue to indulge their sugar habit. The result is cause for alarm. Among obesity scientists, health providers and the medical community, there is major concern about sugar’s addictive quality. Barry Popkin, author of “The World is FAT” thinks that sugar-based diets, especially high consumption of soft drinks, are killing us. According to another source, Nature Cures Clinic of Portland, Oregon, our “daily bread” has turned into a non-stop feeding frenzy of sweets, artificial sweeteners and refined carbohydrates. What to do? Exercise, of course. Eat more fruits, vegetables and whole grains and reduce salt and saturated fats, absolutely. Health and policy professionals like Profs. Popkin and world-renown public health scholars, Harvard’s Prof. Walter Willet and Yale Prof. Kelly D. Brownell, also recommend drinking more water. And now, as of January 31, 2011, so does the federal government. For the first time ever in its revised dietary Guidelines, the USDA recommends replacing sugary drinks like soda with water and avoiding fatty foods. [Link: www.cnpp.usda.gov/DietaryGuidelines.htm] (c) 2011 Jonathan Hall Share on Facebook

    Continue Reading...

  • – January 2011 President Barack Obama emphasized rebuilding America in his second (2011) State of the Union address and called for renewed investments in the aging infrastructure systems that sustain economic growth and competitiveness and serve as engines for American jobs. The National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) applauds the President for his leadership on the issue of renewing America’s commitment to infrastructure investments but is disappointed that the President did not include mention of the need to recommit to investing in our water and wastewater infrastructure. America’s communities face a $500 billion need in clean water and drinking water infrastructure investments and federal  leadership and support for greater investment in this infrastructure is essential if we expect our economy  to thrive. It is well documented that our water infrastructure is reaching a tipping point. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) latest infrastructure report card gave the nation’s water infrastructure a D-, the lowest of any infrastructure category. As a result, each day the nation suffers significant losses and damages from broken water and sewer mains, sewage overflows, and scarcity of drinking water supplies among other challenges. Source: National Association of Clean Water Agencies – January 26, 2011 http://www.waterchat.com/News/Federal/11/Q1/fed_110128-03.htm Share on Facebook

    Guest Column: State of the Water Union

    – January 2011 President Barack Obama emphasized rebuilding America in his second (2011) State of the Union address and called for renewed investments in the aging infrastructure systems that sustain economic growth and competitiveness and serve as engines for American jobs. The National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) applauds the President for his leadership on the issue of renewing America’s commitment to infrastructure investments but is disappointed that the President did not include mention of the need to recommit to investing in our water and wastewater infrastructure. America’s communities face a $500 billion need in clean water and drinking water infrastructure investments and federal  leadership and support for greater investment in this infrastructure is essential if we expect our economy  to thrive. It is well documented that our water infrastructure is reaching a tipping point. The American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) latest infrastructure report card gave the nation’s water infrastructure a D-, the lowest of any infrastructure category. As a result, each day the nation suffers significant losses and damages from broken water and sewer mains, sewage overflows, and scarcity of drinking water supplies among other challenges. Source: National Association of Clean Water Agencies – January 26, 2011 http://www.waterchat.com/News/Federal/11/Q1/fed_110128-03.htm Share on Facebook

    Continue Reading...